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.s. history that have transformed the laws of the country and illuminated protections afforded to religion in the u.s. constitution. this interview, part of booktv's college series, was recorded at the university of pennsylvania in philadelphia. it's about 20 minutes. >> host: university of pennsylvania professor sarah gordon, "the spirit of the law" is her most recent book. what do you mean when you talk about the old constitutional world and the new constitutional world when it comes to religion? >> guest: well, for most of our nation's history, it was the states rather than federal government that controlled access to religious worship, the rights of religious organizations and so on. and in the early decades of the 20th century, that began to shift as the supreme court applied the national constitutional establishment and free exercise clauses of the first amendment against the states sort of centralizing debates about religion. >> host: but if the states had the control, we had it written into our constitution, freedom of religion. >> guest: we did, indeed. but the first amendment beg
with the a ministration. the pendant that was put into the law when there were set up which made them an independent voice cannot sell rights, it was really important. they should not try to be friendly with some particular administration. their job was to be a watchdog. a watchdog over with the demonstration was doing. and they learned that. and then when kennedy was assassinated and johnson was uprose civil-rights because of that the civil rights act of '64 and '65, actually enacted into law. >> of a point did you become aware in your life of the civil rights commission? >> i became aware of them when i was in the graduate program university. asked if i work on a project. >> sixty's, 70's. >> yes. i used some of the reports because the reports they did were very good reports. some of the historical research that i did. so i was very much aware of them. finally by the time the commission as to me since i've do legal and constitutional history file would read something of a history of abortion rights for them and how that all played out and what the history had been all the way back to england and so on.
the first mother-in-law walk through the marion robertson, ma leaand sasha obama. ma leais 14 and sasha is 11. they are dressed head to toe in jay crew. >> thank you for the fashion. >> i will be keeping up with the fashion all day. >> what do you look to in the past when you look at a second inaugural? >> i think it's another affirmation of the american system, have people out on the mall, see the president and the transfer of power and that's the glory of american system and that's what george washington brought, the first person to give up power, no one thought he was going to do it. even though it's a ceremony but it's a ceremony that is -- it bring's lot to our country and to our nation. >> is it one of those ceremonies, do you agree with beverly and richard that the second time in many respects, speaks more to what people's expectations are of their president than the first time. >> there's been an affirmation of what braun did by a majority of american people. and it turns out, a bigger majority than people thought. many people thought he wasn't going to win at all so this is, i
in jewish settlements of occupied palestinian land, which is seen illegal by international law. but even that is not enough to appease some of his former supporters on the right. -- >> one report said that there was a record surge in settlement expansion, not enough for those on the right to say that he is not tough enough for the palestinians. >> israel has to be strong on their negotiations and by being weak -- this is detrimental. >> others worry that his decision to form an alliance with the older-nationalist lieberman could hurt israel overseas. >> israel is going to be under the brunt of increased international criticism and what is most dangerous is the criticism from europe and the united states, not from the people who don't particularly like us. >> benjamin netanyahu and barack obama have never been close, and the u.s. president is resigned to a difficult relationship with a more right-wing government in israel. -- >> an election watched very closely, even here on inauguration day, and prince harry is on his way home after another toward of duty in afghanistan. he has confessed
and help sure the safety our children, reform immigration law and establish equal rights for gay americans. he devoted several sentences to the battle against climate change which is notable considering some of the critics barely took on the issue the first term. the facts back that up. the president called for our divided congress to act. >> for now, decisions are upon us. we cannot afford delay. we cannot mistake absolutism for principle or substitute spectacle for politics or treat name-calling as reasoned debate. we must act. we must act, knowing our work will be imperfect. >>shepard: he defended the social welfare programs including medicare, medicaid, and social security. now we turn to ed henry live in lafayette park. the president drew inspiration from abraham lincoln and dr. martin luther king jr. in the speech. >>reporter: no doubt. it is no secret this is the first african-american secret and he happens to be sworn in on the same day we celebrate martin luther king jr. day. he was drawing if his remarks, in the address, clearly inspiration from both dr. king, abraham lincoln, hi
officers have been sworn in to help d.c.'s regular contingent of law enforcement. fox 5's karen gray houston has that part of the story. >> i will perform the duties of a special deputy -- >> reporter: a u.s. marshal deputized 150 law enforcement officers from around the country at a special swearing in ceremony to help out metro transit police. >> we could not do it without you. we know the history of the last inauguration and what a visiting officer from houston did to save the life of a 59- year-old lady. >> reporter: the officers received last minute training on the campus of the university of maryland university college. they also got special presidential inaugural badges. you can't be too secure on inauguration day. not only is metro swearing in officers from out of town, so is mpd. across town at american university's bender arena more than 2,000 visiting police officers were sworn in to assist mpd during the presidential inaugural. their training comes as the city lowered crowd estimates to around 600,000 people. that compares to nearly 2 million in 2009. whatever, d.c.'s p
, in this private ceremony in the white house. >> by law, he has to begin on january 20th. the public ceremony will take place today. sonia sotomayor swore in the vice president yesterday. >>> one of the big things is keeping people safe. >> there will be a no fly zone within a 30-mile radius of the capitol. on the water, the coast guard will shut down six miles of the potomac. vehicle traffic restricted from using 150 blocks in the district. more measures, including toxic air detectors, plainclothes security officers and thousands of doses of antidotes in case of a chemical or biological attack are also on stand by. it's estimated that all the security costs about $120 million. you can expect tight security if you're heading to the national mall today to watch the president take the oath of office. >> news 4's megan mcgrath is live on the mall for us this morning. megan, good morning. >> reporter: well, good morning. we're standing here on madison street. you can see that things are rather quiet. just the press primarily down here. although there are some early birds coming early trying to ge
officially took the oath yesterday as was required by law. after that, there's a congressional luncheon and then the parade. >> live team coverage for you. sarah simmons is live at the white house. wisdom martin is catching up with all the people. lauren has everything you need to know about today's parade. >> we want to begin with our own tom fitzgerald. he is live on the west front. >> reporter: good morning to you and allison. as we were looking down the national mall as the sun is now up, we're able to see we can see you down there from your vantage point overlooking pennsylvania avenue. for the most part here, the crowd on the west front as begun to fill out fairly nicely at this point. we arrived here shortly after 5:00 a.m. this morning when most of the media folks here were allowed to begin on to the grounds. one thing we noticed quickly as for all the preparations underway up here since october when they drove the first nail into the platform, many of these seats were still being set up as we came up in here this morning. you are seeing a mix of different kinds of configuration
was telling them that there's a difference between a speech in front of a law school class and a campaign speech. he was this not getting that. he spent a lot of time in black churches listening to preachers. that really influenced his speaking style. the next time heard him after that was in 2004 at the heartland cafe and my jaw dropped. >> he worked for her. he wanted to go with her. >> she graduated from law school before he had. >> there is the vice president. san >> [applause] >> [music] >> [inaudible] >>the president of the united staes and mrs. obama. >> [applause] >> [applasuuse] >> [inaudible] >> ladies and gentleman please take your seats. >> mr. president mr. vice president, honored guests. we are pleased to welcome you to today's inaugural luncheon. and this historic room we look around at the 35 statues representing men and women. i feel obligated to know that she was born in rochester n.y.. thankfully she will soon have company when rosa parks completes her journey. we look around and a member of the men and women who helped define our nation. they like us face o
the country to oppose the white house effort to reform the nation's gun laws. at demonstrations in pennsylvania and ohio, gun owners pilloried calls for stricter gun control. >> no law put on law abiding citizens has ever deterred crime. they're going to take my gun so i can get shot. >> my thoughts is, tell the leftwing liberal idiots in washington to leave our guns alone. we're not hurting anything. it is the criminals. deal with the criminals, not the law abiding citizens. >> the pro-gun rallies also coincided with a series of nationwide gun shows where at least five people were wounded when their firearms accidentally went off. in north carolina, three people were injured when a shotgun accidentally fired as its owner removed it from its case. another gun owner accidentally shot himself in indianapolis, while an ohio a gun show attendee was injured by stray bullet. president obama is set to publicly take the oath of office today at his second term inauguration in washington. obama gathered with his family sunday in the blue room of the white house to privately recite the 35-
. progresso. i just served my mother-in-law your chicken noodle soup but she loved it so much... i told her it was homemade. everyone tells a little white lie now and then. but now she wants my recipe [ clears his throat ] [ softly ] she's right behind me isn't she? [ male announcer ] progresso. you gotta taste this soup. of green giant vegetables it's easy to eat like a giant... ♪ and feel like a green giant. ♪ ho ho ho ♪ green giant >>> you're watching fox 5 morning news special coverage of the 57th presidential inauguration. >> straight ahead at 8:00, a celebration of the country and its citizens. today president obama begins his second term with a symbolic oath of office in fronts of hundreds and thousands of witnesses to history. >> this is a day when politics takes a backseat. and when the white house looks forward to the next four years, we look back at the life of martin luther king jr. whose work and sacrifice helped transform a dream into reality. it is monday january 21st, 2013. inauguration day and dr. martin luther king jr. day. good morning i'm tony perkins. >> and i'm a
150 officers from 15 law enforcement agencies have been deputized to help out metro transit police, officers from as far away as the bay area and seattle washington tasked with a big job. >> moving crowds is the whole focus for metro, making sure people move safely from point a to point b, visitors coming in for the first time, ensure they have a safe and pleasant trip on the metro. >> reporter: metro wants to avoid what happened in the 2009 inauguration when long lines of cars spilled out onto streets and highways trying to get into suburban metro parking lots because metro charged as cars went in. >> we're not doing that again. we are instead charging for parking as you exit and you can pay with a credit card or your smartrip camp. >> reporter: speaking of smartrip cards, here's some important advice. >> get your smartrip card or farecard in advance. >> reporter: load it up with enough money to pay for your trip to the mall and back. >> now you got to scan it again. >> reporter: we found lots of metro riders at the tenleytown station trying to do just that. >> i'll probably g
>>> good morning. four more years. >> health care reform is no longer -- it is the law of the land. >>> united states conducted an operation that killed osama bin laden. >>> the majority of those who died today were children, beautiful little kids between the ages of 5 and 10 years old. >>> we know in our hearts that for the united states of america, the best is yet to come. >>> president barack obama, the 44th president, takes the oath of office to serve a second term. and we're here for all the tradition, pageantry and tradition "today," monday, january 21st, 2013. >> announcer: from nbc news, this is a special edition of "today," the second inauguration of barack obama, with matt lauer and savannah guthrie live from washington, d.c. >>> and good monday morning to you, everyone. welcome to a special edition of "today" on a monday morning from capitol hill. as you look at the white house there, now the capitol. i'm matt lauer alongside savannah guthrie, natalie morales and mr. al roker. >> beautiful sunrise in washington. no matter who you voted for, this is an historic day for th
. he enacted into law. [applause] >> than a two-year anniversary of lilly ledbetter legislation. forward if women are in the congress and committee. we will have to deal with issues like the safety of our children. thank you for making this a part of your agenda. you will have to be dealing with the issue that relates to violence against women. we need to pass that legislation. we have to deal with jobs. i want to say a personal thanks. if we did not have some many women in the congress we never would have the first woman speaker of the house. you haven't seen that the net. having strength and numbers for women leading the way are helping to change the playing field. i promise you this. it increases the level of civility in politics. we will change the environment in which politics is being conducted. we will elect many more women to public office. that is a very good thing for our country. thank you, and lee's list. we are emilie, and we ain't seen nothing -- -- thank you, emily's list. seene emilie, and we ain't nothing yet. >> are you emilie? --emily? -- emily? >> hello. i am
pretty much. he went to the best schools in the country, columbia and on to harvard law. he becomes editor of the harvard law review in a blind test. nobody knew -- there's no affirmative action here. blind test. you were the guy that had the best writings, the best research, the best scholarship to get the job. and then he comes back and instead of being a money grubber on wall street, excuse me money grubbers on wall street, he decides he's going to do something for his community where he came from. and then he runs for office, gets beaten by bobby rush and then he gets in a car and drives out to the burbs and lets them decide. >> michelle obama did the same thing. she resented princeton a lot when she got there but she channeled her resentment in a paper about the history of african-american women. the fact they worked within the system given the challenges that they had to have gotten to this place and to be the calming influence that they are i think is remarkable. >> calming, mosh care calm than. >> low bar. low bar. but with an inner fire though. you know -- . >> they proved
stressful moments for the authorities. as a result, we have more than 13,000 military and law enforcement personnel, ready for this event. we have snipers on the roofs. we have biological and chemical units prepared to deal with whatever comes up. we have a high degree of surveillance. satellites zooming in on the mall, as well as hundreds of surveillance cameras, to watch potential suspects. as one official told me last night, we have no specific threat. but we have to be ready for anything, george. >> and i know they've been preparing for this for a year. they've been locking the buildings on the parade route. they've been locking the garbage cans on the parade route. repaved the road. they are taking no chances. we have an incredible team of presidential savvy with us this morning. i want a quick word from two of them sitting with us here. let's start with matthew dowd, contributor to abc news. you have contributed to a combine, as well. both sides of the aisle. what does it take for a president to take a second inauguration and make it soaring? >> well, it's a much different situation
are equal under the constitution and under the laws of this country. and what a better time for the city and county of san francisco to send a message that recognizes the dignity and humanity of this community, by dodging the contributions of one of its heroes harvey milk. that is what this is about. my proposal to name this airport is the first airport named after an openly gay person we are in no way trying to diminish the work and accomplishments of other individuals who are also deserving of that honor. this has to be viewed in the context of what is happening in this country and in this world. it has to be viewed in the context of history. one of the things that i have learned about my term on the board of supervisors is that time flies. time goes by very quickly. i am now beginning my fifth year as a member of this board. and the decisions that we make are important. they are the most important when we can impact people's lives; when we can change people's lives and how people see the world. what is amazing about this idea is that those 40 million people, those 9 million peopl
, you can't hear this case. you trust -- and i think rightly -- in our system of rule of law in appreciating that judges are aware of the things that might influence them and understand that they have an obligation to ensure that their decisions are not based on their personal feelings, but based on the law. >> what do you think justice clarence thomas, who also has written about his experiences with affirmative action, and he uses the words "humiliating" when he describes his experience. it's the polar opposite of your experience. why do you think he has a completely different experience? >> was it? i mean, my book talks about the negative aspects of affirmative action, the stereotypes, the feelings -- and i use the word in my book -- of being expected to feel shame. >> and you engage people. you don't seem ashamed. you took them on. you explained, here is why you are wropg. >> well, that's because that's what i came out of the experience with, and i want people to understand that there's a flip side to shame. >> do you think you ask too many questions in the court? i mean,
will always get guns. doesn't mean you don't make laws. if that is the case you didn't make laws because people would always break them. according to gallup, 53% support president's on gun control. "time" magazine as 56%. there is great support in congress and senate at least among the american people for the president to do what he wants to do. martha: we have another poll we want to look at. it shows basically americans believe the most important thing is to protect the constitutional right of the second amendment to own guns. 51% say that. 40% say they think the most important part is to protect citizens from gun violence. just a quick thought on that, mark. we have to go. we have to break away to something live here. >> exactly. protecting americans from gun violence, the assault weapons ban doesn't do that we had assault weapons ban from 1994 to 2004. it expired in 2004. you know what happened? guns violence went down since the sought weapons ban expired. bill: the white house giving a bit of the theme for the speech. moments away in washington. martha: a major weather alert in part
and uphold our values through strengths of arms and rule of law. we will show courage to try and resolve our differences with other nations peaceably not because we are 90 but because engagements can lift suspicion and fear. america " remain at the anger of a strong alliance. we will extend our capacity to manage a crisis and fraud. we will support democracy from asia to africa to the americans to the middle east. our interest and our conscience compel us to act on behalf of those who long for freedom. we must be a source of hope for the port, sick, marginalized, victims of prejudice. peace requires the advance of those principles. tolerance and opportunity. human dignity. justice. we the people declare the most evidence of sure that all of us are declared equal. just as they guided all those men and women we can not walk alone. our individual freedom is inexplicably bound for the freedom. it is our generation's path to carry on what those pioneers began. our journey is not complete until our mothers and daughters can earn a living equal to their efforts. our journey is not complete until ou
having arrived at the platform, greeting both of his daughters and his wife and mother-in-law. you see behind him, there is vice president biden, chuck schumer, chair of the inaugural committee is the first person we'll hear from and call proceedings to order. and then it unfolds like the greatest graduation ceremony ever. >> rachel, there's a moment when the new president takes over, like when reagan took over from carter, when the chief of secret service walks behind one guy to the other guy, it is pretty creepy. it is pretty creepy when you're the guy losing protection, but nicely enough, it will be the same guy there. >> jerry ford was the first president who upon leaving office from the inauguration of the new president, jimmy carter, decided to leave by helicopter, seen as a rather odd way to leave on the way, but every president has followed that tradition. it is a dramatic way to get out of dodge. also your last ride in marine one. >> you want to allow the indulgence just a bit. >> one of the things as yet undetermined for the second term is who exactly will make up the preside
and uphold our values through strength of arms and the rule of law. we will show the courage to try and resolve our differences with other nations peacefully, not because we are naive about the dangers we face, but because engagement can lift suspicion and fear. america will remain the anchor of strong alliances in every corner of the globe. and we will renew those institutions that extend our capacity to manage crisis abroad. for no one has a greater stake in a peaceful world than its most powerful nation. we will support democracy from asia to africa, from the americas to the middle east because our interests and our conscious compel us to act on behalf of those who long for freedom. we must be a source of hope to the poor, the sick, the magicalized, the victims of prejudice, not out of mere charity, but because peace in our time requires the constant advance of those principles that our common creed describes, tolerance and opportunity, human dignity and justice. we, the people, declared today that the most evident of truths that all of us are created equal. it is the star that g
think he did. >> he's harvard two degrees -- >> so how could he so misstate the law on guns when in fact scalia and the supreme court in 2008 specifically said a woman in anacostia in a crack house next door could have a handgun? and also saying the president exploited this, could somebody tell him he's actually senator of a very large demographically changing state and not the spokesman for the tea party for, like, you know, the greater tea party, the greater houston chapter of the tea party? i was shocked. >> i was shocked too. frankly, because he seemed to be saying in the senatorial way, cruz, my friend and they barely know each other. cruz went after him over and over and over again. it was a very unusual performance by a freshman senator who doesn't seem to want to get along, wants to start a fire here. >> the problem is mika if this had happened in 2010 i'd say i understand the politics of it. the republican party i'm sorry, we have our backs against the wall. the president of the united states has a 52% approval rating. john boehner has an 18% approval
laws in this country. how much a part of the president's resolve will that be in the months coming? >> well, the thing -- the president always said that, you know, you have to do many things at once when you're president, and that's a very important thing. we can't keep replicating these tragedies and it's not just the big tragedies, but the small, smaller strategy dtragedies than the streets every day. so he's determined to move forward on this package of laws. they're not the only things we need to do. some of the things have less to do with government and more to do with what we -- what we do in our home. what our children play and in terms of video games and what they watch. but certainly we need to do something about guns. we are hopeful that we're at a moment when we can pass the impasse that we have seen in the past and really move forward on it. >> hey, david, bob schieffer here. >> hey, bob. >> in normal times, probably we wouldn't report this, but in these fractured times this just in as they say. i'm told that speaker boehner, eric cantor, the number two republican in th
definition when it's convenient. to grant amnesty is to pardon immigration law breakers and reward them with the objective of their crime. if that's what this bill does, it would fit the definition of amnesty. >> could your speaker survive if he allowed that bill to come to the floor of the house of representatives? >> i think we'd want to look at the language on that. john boehner's tone and his body language and everything i heard him say at the retreat in williamsburg, he and our leadership team was all about how we pull our conference together and work together. i don't think you'll see another bill come to the floor that's got that large a number of democrat votes we've seen in the past. i think it's going to be a republican agenda that he drives, and i think it's about unifying our conference. >> what about gun control? >> that's another situation that's rolling out in front of us. both of these issues, immigration and gun control, one of them, the immigration, was launched the morning after the election, before they actually analyzed the election polls. i think some republicans o
the law for if we are truly created equal, then surely the love we commit to one another must be equal as well. our journey is not complete until no citizen is forced to wait for hours to exercise the right to vote. our journey is not complete until we find a better way to welcome the striving, hopeful immigrants who still see america as a land of opportunity, until bright, young students and engineers are listed in our work force rather than expelled from our country. our journey is not complete until all our children from the streets of detroit to the hills of appalachia to the quiet lanes of newtown know that they are cared for and cherished and always safe from harm. that is our generation's task: to make these works, these rights, these values of life and liberty and the pursuit of happiness real for every american >> brown: the broad theme for this inaugural was faith in america's future. the president closed his remarks by looking forward to the expected political battles. he urged both parties to work together for the good of the country but also called for citizens to hold the
law enforcement officers now on duty for inauguration events, police from across the country were sworn in as deputy u.s. marshals. american university hosted a security briefing yesterday. a lot of folks said their work will be much different if their normal jobs. >> we do have special security details back home. but not to this level. >> it's a once in a lifetime deal for us. i'm glad to be a part of history. >> extra officers also arrived in town this weekend to help metro transit police. >> president obama will use two bibles for his public swearing in ceremony. >> the president will use martin luther king jr.'s personal bible on this national holiday honoring the slain civil rights leader. the president will use the bible that president abraham lincoln used when he was sworn in as president in 1861. the president used the same bible in his first inauguration, both bibles will be stacked on top of each other. what an amazing sight that will be to have both bibles, the historical significance and the responsibility the presidency that's represented in the bibles as well. >> abs
sen ceremony at the white house. he has to take the oath on january 20th by law. >>> he will use two bibles for the public swearing in ceremony. this one is president abraham lincoln's bible when he was sworn in, in 1861. he will use martin luther king jr. personal bible. it has extra significance in this inauguration because it's happening on the federal holiday that honors the civil rights leader. both bibles will be stacked on top of each other. in the first inauguration, the president used the lincoln bible as well. martin luther king jr.'s bible, it was his traveling bible when he would go places to make speeches. he would take that bible with him. he'd be able to study from that bible and pull verses if he wanted to insert things into speeches. >> how is that having your hand on the bible used by lincoln and martin luther king jr. >> absolutely. >> the first family observed martin luther king jr. day on saturday with a day of service, of course. >> with thousands of others. >>> if you're planning to go to the national mall, plan on leaving plenty of extra time. >> you're going
our people and uphold our values through strength of arms and rule of law. we will show the courage to try and resolve our differences with other nations peacefully, not because we are naive about the dangers we face but because engagement can more endureably lift suspicion and fear. [applause] america will remain the anchor of strong alliances in every corner of the globe and we will renew those institutions that extend our capacity to manage crises abroad for no one has a greater stake in a peaceful world than its most powerful nation. we'll support democracy from asia to africa, from the america's to the middle east because our interests and our consnscinsenceen compel to act on behalf of those who long for freedom and we must be a source of hope for the poor, the sick, the marginalized, the victims of prejudice, not out of mere charity but because peace in our time requires a constant advance of those principles that our common creed describes. tolerance and opportunity, human dignity and justice. we, the people, declare today that the most evident of truths, that all of us are
go to commercial break, let's take a look. there you see the -- the president's mother-in-law. gloria, they will be making their way here to -- to the capitol. as the -- president's aides get ready to get in the various cars. what part of the white house is this? >> i think we are looking right now at the north door. the president has been attending a coffee with congressional leaders, with senate leader mitch mcconnell. speaker boehner and congressman eric cantor. i confirmed that. with each of their offices. a nice bipartisan tradition and good way to kick off a new term. those of you discussing he does not do enough socializing with leaders, here he is doing just that. he's been with -- the wives, vice president biden and his wife has been there as has the first lady. they will then head in the motorcade and make their way up here to the capitol where they will go into a hold for about an hour before the president speaks. >> senator john kerry arriving at the capitol. there's senator kerry. >> confirmation hearings. secretary of state. >> this is the entrance you see usually in the
law that eventually came apart in 1964. the student newspaper supported the marchers. we had some black students in chapel hill at that time and felt that if they couldn't eat in the same restaurants with all the rest of us, that budget right. and so all of these photographs were taken initially for either the student newspaper or for i served as a string err for some of the -- stringer for some of the local wire services and what not. today in publishing the book one of the purposes was to let some of today's generation who still live in chapel hill and are descendants from the people in photographs know and understand what their parents and grandparents did so that they can enjoy the same freedoms that in some manner they take for granted often today to be able to go into a lunch counter or wherever. >> host: so 1961-1964, and i'm guessing you can speak to the majority of these and you can recall the moment? we're looking at this one right here, group of folks in front of a merchant's association. >> guest: after having picketed for a number of months, they decided it was time t
minimum wage and clean air laws and f.d.a and all of those things. from the bottom up, people demanded it in their workplaces, in their coal mines, in their churches and ethnic organizations and their schools. >> well, senator brown, let me congratulate you and your election. they spent $20,000 trying to defeat you and you're still here. >> thank you. >> thanks for your time tonight. >> you're watching a special edition of politics nation on msnbc on a historic day, president obama's inauguration. this is the place for politics. msnbc. ♪ and the home of the brave i didn't think it was anything. i had pain in my abdomen... it just wouldn't go away. i was spotting, but i had already gone through menopause. these symptoms may be nothing... but they could be early warning signs of a gynecologic cancer, such as cervical, ovarian, or uterine cancer. feeling bloated for no reason. that's what i remember. seeing my doctor probably saved my life. warning signs are not the same for everyone. if you think something's wrong... see your doctor. ask about gynecologic cancer. and get the inside kno
and sisters are treated like anyone else under the law. for if we are truly created equal, then surely we -- then surely the love we commit to one another must be equal as well. an historic statement to be made on a very big stage. >> an historic change of position on the part of the president. he did not start off his presidency feeling that way about that particular issue. he's evolved over the course of his presidency. he feels the rest of the country will come along. >> he now fully supports gay marriage in the united states. you see the vice president and the president, they are still there. they're watching this parade continue to unfold. up next, by the way, after the lesbian and gay band association, native american women warriors. they will be recognized. they will be celebrated as well. here they come. native american women warriors from pueblo west, colorado. this is the first recognized all native women veteran color guard. dressed in traditional jingle dresses as they're called with accessories of beadwork and feathers. lovely, lovely cultural moment here at this inaugural pa
are clear of potential snipers, manhole covers welded shut, s.w.a.t. teams over the city. plain clothes law enforcement lingering in the crowd. bomb-sniffing dogs, and teams trained on mass destruction. >> dive team, intelligence analysts will be working around the clock. our hostage negotiators. >> reporter: that fbi official spoke to us inside the multiagency communications center, real time monitoring of surveillance cameras posted on buildings and roads and share tips and incidenident reports. with checkpoints, monitoring stations and other precautions, this stage, the parade route along pennsylvania avenue, where the real unknown comes in. often along here where the president gets out of his car. that's when the president is most exposed and the crowds are massive. >> if he gets out of his car and walks, what's going through your mind at that moment? >> through my mind is having faith hain the plan and assumin that the agents are doing their job. >> reporter: haggin says the secret service o choreographs where he gets out of the limo and where he gets back in. when it's all over? a big
[ woman ] ring. ring. progresso. i just servemy mother-in-law your chicken noodle soup but she loved it so much... i told her it was homemade. everyone tells a little white lie now and then. but now she wants my recipe [ clears his throat ] [ softly ] she's right behind me isn't she? [ male announcer ] progresso. you gotta taste this soup. of green giant vegetables it's easy to eat like a giant... ♪ and feel like a green giant. ♪ ho ho ho ♪ green giant >>> good morning. you are taking a live look at the u.s. capitol. flacks all out there getting ready for the ceremonies this morning to inaugurate president obama. we have a lot of out of town visitors here. i know what everybody wants to know is was the weather going to be like for the outside activities today. take it away. >> it will generally cooperate. we've done much worse as far as temperatures in the years past. this year, it looks like we'll be in the low to mid-40s around the noon hour. >> not bad. >> and we can expect at least partial sunshine so it should be a decent day. the heads up here is we've got some cold air on the
, he will probably have to move because with the way that the laws are, especially in california and new york, a lot of the players and professional athletes are getting taxed at such a high rate that they almost have to move were also much of their income is going to go to the government. gerri: us take a look at those numbers. his state tax will go to a 13%. that is a state income tax which means he will pay an additional 2 million in taxes. that doesn't even include the federal increase in taxes that we talk so much about the end of last year which would go to a 39 and a half%. this is a fella who has a net worth of 150 million, making money every single year. he will have a very big tax tab. >> absolutely. >> absolutely commit to the point where he is probably going to have to either move to another state income-tax state or have to move to the caribbean or move out of the estates. gerri: what is that? >> essentially, any place where an athlete place, within their jurisdiction they have to file taxes. so across all sports respectively they have to file in the state where they
the stage. for many people, when the mother-in-law of the president actually moved into the white house, it seemed like the perfect moment for a sitcom. that never happened. but the president's daughters now we've watched them grow up in the white house under four years under the scrutiny of the public eye. i think sasha had the greatest moment of the entire campaign yesterday when after he took the oath of office, she could be audibly heard congratulating her daddy for not messing up. >> jennifer: you know what's ironic about that. i was of watching another program this morning. they were offended that the president after he was done said to his daughter, i did it. as though i did it. i got elected instead of i got through this without messing up. because -- >> jennifer: exactly. it wasn't a we built this moment but famously, four years ago, the president made some -- omitted some words in the oath of office which is why john roberts had to give him the oath of office again the next day. that coupled with the fact that this year, inauguration day falls on a monday and he had to be swor
as the national hall here and there are some 40 law enforcement agencies that work in the district of columbia when you consider the federal, the local, various different agencies, fbi, justice department, et cetera, et cetera, it goes on and on and on and they're out in full force and last night several thousand national guardsmen were deployed and they'll have to filter through that. it's smaller than in years past and four years ago 1.82 million people here and this time around they've lowered the crowd estimates from originally expected from 6 to 800 down to 5 to 700,000, it's chilly, but folks are already in the lines and quite a stampede in the next three hours as we get ready for the president getting ready to take his inaugural, having been officially sworn in yesterday. >> brian: carl, how many red bulls so far. >> gretchen: oh, my gosh. >> reporter: haven't cracked them yet. a few days, but we'll have our share. >> brian:'s got six with him, who is he kidding? thanks so much. we had a problem, none of our guests could get through the security. and jim brown had a knee operation and
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